Seventh Fatality is Especially Tragic

Wisconsin Bike Fed
 

It’s our sad job to let you know that Wisconsin has just experienced its seventh bike fatality of the year. An eleven-year old boy died as the result of a crash on University Avenue in Madison on Monday morning.

On behalf of the entire Wisconsin Bike Fed family, our members, board members and staff we send our heartfelt condolences to his family and young friends.

Wisconsin experiences ten bike fatalities in a typical year so we are, unfortunately, ahead of pace. And, in fact, overall crashes and fatalities involving all vehicles are the highest they’ve been at this point in the year since 2012, reversing a two-year downward trend. While we don’t know why this is happening, it could be that there is more travel overall due to lower gas prices and other trends.

The poignancy of the latest death is highlighted by the fact that the governor signed a budget bill on Sunday that repeals Wisconsin’s successful Complete Streets law. While we don’t yet know the details of Monday’s tragedy we do know that Complete Streets have saved lives. It was senseless to repeal the law and it seems even more unconscionable in light of this latest fatality.

About Dave Cieslewicz, Executive Director

Dave Cieslewicz served two terms as mayor of Madison where he set the city on a path for Platinum status as one of the best biking cities in North America. Before that he started his own nonprofit, 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, which focuses on land use and transportation policy. He has been an adjunct professor at the UW Madison's Department of Urban and Regional Planning where he teaches a class called Bikes, Pedestrians and Cities. He pronounces his name chess LEV ich, but nobody else does.

3 thoughts on “Seventh Fatality is Especially Tragic

  1. Hi Dave, I’m with you on the Complete Streets issue, but let’s leave politics out of it when you sadly announce a cyclist death. Save it for another day – another post. – Neilg.

  2. Neil, Two responses. First, I don’t believe we should leave politics out of anything. It’s how we govern ourselves, how we make common decisions. Second, it’s relevant and just factual that the governor signed a bill passed by Republicans that repealed Complete Streets. To leave out that information or to imply that both parties are equally culpable would be less than honest.

    • Thanks Dave; you are absolutely right in speaking truth to power (regardless of the party or individual that messed up). Keep up the good work and the good fight for cyclist safety/rights. :-)

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